Saturday, 17 November 2012

Duck confit



This week, with the cold nights drawing in, i put the kettle on, had a brew, and thought about my next project. I was reading through the closest thing I have to a holy book - HFW's River Cottage Meat book - when I came across the recipe and pictures for duck confit. What could be better in this cold weather than meat poached for hours in fat until it's meltingly tender? It's something I'd thought of making one day, but never actually got round to (as with many things that I say I'll do 'one day').

"Sod it", I thought to myself, "I should make some".

I stood up (inadvertently spilling tea across the table) and proclaimed in a booming voice ,"I will make duck confit" pointing across the room I added, "To the Man Cave!". Sadly the effect was diminished somewhat by the room being empty, and the fact that I don't have a Man Cave. Or a booming voice.

No matter, a plan was beginning to form in my mind. Not only could I confit some duck, but I could also use some of it to make duck rillettes (that's potted duck to those of us that aren't French).

In their book Ruhlman and Polcyn say "confit should not bring potpourri to mind when you eat it". Wise and obvious words, I'm sure you all agree. I tried to keep the flavours fairly simple as the rillettes will have other flavours added. I trawled the intertubes and my book collection for cooking times. As usual they were all different (ranging from 2 hours to 10 hours), so I went straight down the middle with 5 hours. I managed to squeeze 6 duck legs one of the larger-sized Kilner jars (although I had to just put the meat of the final two legs in, no bones). I'm storing them in fat to let them mature for a few weeks before making the rillettes.

Duck Confit Recipe


Ingredients 
Ingredients
6 duck legs;
2 tablespoons salt;
2 cloves of garlic;
2 bay leaves;
1 teaspoon fresh thyme;
6 peppercorns;
Fat (enough to cover the legs; I used goose fat and lard for reasons given below)

1) Using a pestle and mortar smash up the salt, garlic, bay, thyme and peppercorns.

2) Take half of the resulting herby, garlicy salt and rub it into the duck. Turn the duck over and rub in the remaining salt. Place the duck into a suitably-sized container. Cover with cling film and leave to cure in the fridge overnight (and for up to 24 hours if you'd like; I left mine for 16 hours).
3) The next day discard the pink juice that the salt has leached from the meat and rinse off the duck pieces. Make sure to dry them of properly with some kitchen paper. Arrange the pieces in an oven-proof container - a single layer if possible, but two layers is fine. 

4) Melt the fat in a saucepan and pour over the duck making sure the legs are completely submerged. It was at this point that I discovered that I didn't have enough fat. I had failed to recognise that 2 jars of fat would not, in fact, cover 6 duck legs in a container that holds at least ten-times the volume of a single jar. Undeterred, I returned to the supermarket, found that goose fat was no longer on offer, and settled for some good old lard.

Brain-stem tease...
5) Cook for 5 hours at 85 °C. Your kitchen will fill with the aroma of slow roasting duck: a delicious, bewitching smell that caresses your brain-stem and makes it scream "Yes, yes, open the oven, eat it, EAT IT NOW!".
6) Allow the confit to cool. It will keep for up to one week in the fridge if you leave it in the original container. If you want to keep in longer (as I did) you'll need to remove the stock/duck juice layer underneath the fat. Remove the duck pieces from the fat (you might need to heat it a bit to loosen them; be careful they'll be very fragile). Re-melt the fat and strain it to remove any bits. Place the duck legs in a suitable container and pour over the hot fat. Try and get a fat layer at least 1" thick over the top of the legs. They'll keep for a few months somewhere cold and dark.  

2 comments:

  1. Great recipe... I've used it several times in the past few years & it's always been a success!

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